Richard Wilhelm on hexagram 2 of the I Ching, the Receptive

Saoirse Aibhlinn, 2005 Registered Gypsy Cross Mare, and friend

Saoirse Aibhlinn, 2005 Registered Gypsy Cross Mare, and friend
Image credit: Aibhlinn Farm

The four fundamental aspects of the Creative—“sublime success, furthering through perseverance”—are also attributed to the Receptive. Here, however, the perseverance is more closely defined: it is that of a mare. The Receptive connotes spatial reality in contrast to the spiritual potentiality of the Creative. The potential becomes real and the spiritual becomes spatial through a specifically qualifying definition. Thus the qualification, “of a mare,” is here added to the idea of perseverance. The horse belongs to earth just as the dragon belongs to heaven. Its tireless roaming over the plains is taken as a symbol of the vast expanse of the earth. This is the symbol chosen because the mare combines the strength and swiftness of the horse with the gentleness and devotion of the cow.

Only because nature in its myriad forms corresponds with the myriad impulses of the Creative can it make these impulses real. Nature’s richness lies in its power to nourish all living things; its greatness lies in its power to give them beauty and splendor. Thus it prospers all that lives. It is the Creative that begets things, but they are brought to birth by the Receptive. Applied to human affairs, therefore, what the hexagram indicates is action in conformity with the situation. The person in question is not in an independent position, but is acting as an assistant. This means that he must achieve something. It is not his task to try to lead—that would only make him lose the way—but to let himself be led. If he knows how to meet fate with an attitude of acceptance, he is sure to find the right guidance. The superior man lets himself be guided; he does not go ahead blindly, but learns from the situation what is demanded of him and then follows this intimation from fate.
Richard Wilhelm in his translation of The I Ching: or Book of Changes, (Taylor & Francis, 1983), p. 11. Originally published in 1923. Translated into English from the German by Cary F. Baynes, with a foreword by Carl Gustav Jung.

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"The four fundamental aspects of the Creative"
Richard Wilhelm Posted on behalf of Richard Wilhelm on Monday, February 1st, 2010 under Quotations.

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